Joint Workshop on Knowledge Evolution and Ontology Dynamics at ISWC 2012

**Workshop schedule now available**

Over the course of the last decade, the Semantic Web research has engaged in capturing and representing global knowledge in the form of the Linked Data cloud and expressive distributed ontologies of various levels of granularity. Usually, emphasis is put on representing as up-to-date and accurate a state of knowledge as possible. However, an important aspect that has largely been overlooked, and has been treated only in a very rudimentary fashion so far, is the evolution of knowledge itself. Ontology dynamics and versioning is one aspect of this field that has been well studied, but only for the purposes of change-management. This is only one of many facets of knowledge evolution and we propose to create and foster a research community concerned with all aspects of how knowledge evolves and changes over time in the context of the Semantic Web. This includes analysis of trends and change in formal descriptions (i.e., ontologies), but also in associated raw sources of knowledge (scientific publications, unstructured or semi-structured web content, traditional data stores, e-mail or on-line discussion threads, etc.).

 EvoDyn 2012 builds on the success of the 2011 edition and on the previous workshops aggregated under the IWOD workshop series. EvoDyn continues in the tradition of IWOD in being the core annual event to discuss advances in the broad area of ontology dynamics, and to track recent work directly or indirectly related to the problem of evolving ontologies. As ontologies are formal representations of knowledge, the study of their dynamics is an inherent part of investigating the knowledge evolution phenomena, yet it is only one of many relevant aspects this workshop aims to cover in an integral manner.

 In particular, the workshop focuses on analysis of trends and change in formal descriptions (i.e., ontologies), but also in associated raw sources of knowledge (scientific publications, unstructured or semi-structured web content, traditional data stores, e-mail or on-line discussion threads, etc.). We are especially interested in research targeted on various states of knowledge evolution, such as (a) conflicts, (b) consolidation, (c) discovery, (d) paradigm shifts, and (e) breakthroughs. One crucial objective of better understanding these different states may be to study directly the underlying causes and dynamics needed to generate discoveries and breakthroughs. We will only be able to facilitate and possibly also generate such desirable situations if we can understand the process of how knowledge evolves. The process of how knowledge in a field grows and changes, crystallizes, and fractures are all areas of interest of this workshop. The same holds for related novel applied technologies, such as:

  • Tools for tracking the progress of knowledge from latent ideas, through hypotheses to well-supported facts and/or claims;
  • Methods for identifying what are the crucial fulcrum-points where a particular field may blossom or fail;
  • Methodologies and supporting tools for identification and reinforcement of emerging promising trends in various academic and/or industrial domains;
  • Platforms facilitating interconnection and cross-fertilization of related endeavors in isolated disciplines.

ISWC 2012